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The Help

A Novel. Winner of the Boeke Prize and the Orange Prize for Fiction

The #1 New York Times bestselling novel and basis for the Academy Award-winning film-a timeless and universal story about the lines we abide by, and the ones we don't-nominated as one of America's best-loved novels by PBS's The Great American Read.

Aibileen is a black maid in 1962 Jackson, Mississippi, who's always taken orders quietly, but lately she's unable to hold her bitterness back. Her friend Minny has never held her tongue but now must somehow keep secrets about her employer that leave her speechless. White socialite Skeeter just graduated college. She's full of ambition, but without a husband, she's considered a failure.

Together, these seemingly different women join together to write a tell-all book about work as a black maid in the South, that could forever alter their destinies and the life of a small town...
Rezension
Praise for The Help

"The two principal maid characters...leap off the page in all their warm, three dimensional glory...[A] winning novel."-The New York Times

"This could be one of the most important pieces of fiction since To Kill a Mockingbird...If you read only one book...let this be it."-NPR.org

"Wise, poignant...You'll catch yourself cheering out loud."-People

"Graceful and real, a compulsively readable story."-Entertainment Weekly

"A beautiful portrait of a fragmenting world."-The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

"The must-read choice of every book club in the country."-The Huffington Post

"At turns hilarious and heart-warming."-Associated Press

"In a page-turner that brings new resonance to the moral issues involved, Stockett spins a story of a social awakening as seen from both sides of the American racial divide."-The Washington Post
Portrait
Kathryn Stockett was born and raised in Jackson, Mississippi. After graduating from the University of Alabama with a degree in English and creative writing, she moved to New York City, where she worked in magazine publishing and marketing for sixteen years. She currently lives in Atlanta with her husband and daughter.
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  • Two days later, I sit in my parent's kitchen, waiting for dusk to fall. Igive in and light another cigarette even though last night the surgeongeneral came on the television set and shook his finger at everybody,trying to convince us that smoking will kill us. But Mother once toldme tongue kissing would turn me blind and I'm starting to think it'sall just a big plot between the surgeon general and Mother to make sureno one ever has any fun.

    At eight o'clock that same night, I'mstumbling down Aibileen's street as discreetly as one can carrying afifty-pound Corona typewriter. I knock softly, already dying foranother cigarette to calm my nerves. Aibileen answers and I slipinside. She's wearing the same green dress and stiff black shoes aslast time.

    I try to smile, like I'm confident it will workthis time, despite the idea she explained over the phone. "Could we...;sit in the kitchen this time?" I ask. "Would you mind?"

    "Alright. Ain't nothing to look at, but come on back."

    The kitchen is about half the size of the living room and warmer. It smellslike tea and lemons. The black-and-white linoleum floor has beenscrubbed thin. There's just enough counter for the china tea set. I setthe typewriter on a scratched red table under the window. Aibileenstarts to pour the hot water into the teapot.

    "Oh, nonefor me, thanks," I say and reach in my bag. "I brought us some Co-Colasif you want one." I've tried to come up with ways to make Aibileen morecomfortable. Number One: Don't make Aibileen feel like she has to serveme.

    "Well, ain't that nice. I usually don't take my tea tilllater anyway." She brings over an opener and two glasses. I drink minestraight from the bottle and seeing this, she pushes the glasses aside,does the same.

    I called Aibileen after Elizabeth gave me thenote, and listened hopefully as Aibileen told me her idea—for her towrite her own words down and then show me what she's written. I triedto act excited. But I know I'll have to rewrite everything she'swritten, wasting even more time. I thought it might make it easier ifshe could see it in type-face instead of me reading it and telling herit can't work this way.

    We smile at each other. I take a sip of my Coke, smooth my blouse. "So...;" I say.

    Aibileen has a wire-ringed notebook in front of her. "Want me to...;just go head and read?"

    "Sure," I say.

    We both take deep breaths and she begins reading in a slow, steady voice.

    "Myfirst white baby to ever look after was named Alton Carrington Speers.It was 1924 and I'd just turned fifteen years old. Alton was a long,skinny baby with hair fine as silk on a corn...;"

    I begin typing as she reads, her words rhythmic, pronounced more clearly thanher usual talk. "Every window in that filthy house was painted shut onthe inside, even though the house was big with a wide green lawn. Iknew the air was bad, felt sick myself...;"

    "Hang on," I say. I've typed wide greem. I blow on the typing fluid, retype it. "Okay, go ahead."

    "When the mama died, six months later," she reads, "of the lung disease, theykept me on to raise Alton until they moved away to Memphis. I lovedthat baby and he loved me and that's when I knew I was good at makingchildren feel proud of themselves...;"

    I hadn't wanted toinsult Aibileen when she told me her idea. I tried to urge her out ofit, over the phone. "Writing isn't that easy. And you wouldn't havetime for this anyway, Aibileen, not with a full-time job."

    "Can't be much different than writing my prayers every night."

    It was the first interesting thing she'd told me about herself since we'dstarted the project, so I'd grabbed the shopping pad in the pantry."You don't say your prayers, then?"

    "I never told nobody that before. Not even Minny. Find I can get my point
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Beschreibung

Produktdetails

Einband Taschenbuch
Seitenzahl 544
Altersempfehlung ab 18
Erscheinungsdatum 01.04.2011
Sprache Englisch
ISBN 978-0-425-23220-0
Verlag Penguin US
Maße (L/B/H) 20,8/12,8/3 cm
Gewicht 415 g
Buch (Taschenbuch, Englisch)
Buch (Taschenbuch, Englisch)
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Buchhändler-Empfehlungen

so touchy

Milli, Thalia-Buchhandlung Wien

I’ve seen the movie years ago and probably that’s why it took me so long to start reading this book. Usually I read a book, go watch the movie and then I complain how the movie destroyed the whole story. But because I loved the film so much, I was afraid that the book would ‘destroy’ this wonderful experience. How wrong I was. After reading the book I love the movie even more, it so fittingly cast, so well done. Still I would recommend to everyone to read the book, because some parts the movie didn’t manage to get that right. Some characters are even meaner in the book and some are nicer, others where completely forgotten. What I loved most about the book where those characters, those that where forgotten, the quiet girls who weren’t racists but were as progressive as the main character. Simply said: I loved this book (and I still love the movie)!

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Lesenswert, vor allem auf Englisch
von einer Kundin/einem Kunden am 15.04.2015
Bewertet: Einband: Taschenbuch

Tolles Buch, man kann sich kaum entscheiden welche der 3 starken Frauen man am liebsten mag. Es lohnt sich das Buch auf Englisch zu lesen, da bei der Deutschen Übersetzung sprachliche Feinheiten verloren gehen. Die Sprache von Minny unterscheidet sich beispielsweise stark von der Skeeters.

Holpriger Start, dann umso packender
von einer Kundin/einem Kunden aus Bremen am 12.02.2015
Bewertet: Format: eBook (ePUB)

Die Leseprobe habe ich auf Deutsch begonnen. Doch die sehr einfache Sprache, der Slang von Aibileen und Minny, den beiden (schwarzen) Hausmädchen, aus deren Sicht diese Geschichte aus Jackson, Mississipi, in den 60er Jahren erzählt ist, störte mein Lesevergnügen. Ich bin froh, es dann mit der englischen Fassung versucht zu haben... Die Leseprobe habe ich auf Deutsch begonnen. Doch die sehr einfache Sprache, der Slang von Aibileen und Minny, den beiden (schwarzen) Hausmädchen, aus deren Sicht diese Geschichte aus Jackson, Mississipi, in den 60er Jahren erzählt ist, störte mein Lesevergnügen. Ich bin froh, es dann mit der englischen Fassung versucht zu haben. Denn irgendwann hat mich diese Story gepackt! Als dritte Erzählerin kommt eine junge Weiße hinzu, die ihre Rolle im Leben und in der Gesellschaft noch sucht und dabei - durchaus zunächst mit gehöriger Naivität - ein Buchprojekt beginnt, das die Erfahrungen schwarzer Hausmädchen zusammenträgt. Am Ende ist Aibileen im Besonderen meine Heldin geworden - und ich kann nur empfehlen, dieses Buch zu lesen, egal in welcher Sprache!

Großartig!
von Janina Kröger aus Hamburg am 01.06.2012
Bewertet: Einband: Taschenbuch

Dieser Roman spielt in Mississippi der 1960er Jahre und zeigt aus den Perspektiven von drei verschiedenen Frauen die Zeit der Rassentrennung und Vorurteile. Aibeleen und Minny sind schwarze Hausmädchen für die weiße Oberschicht und erleben jeden Tag am eigenen Leib, was es für Menschen in dieser Zeit bedeutete, eine andere Haut... Dieser Roman spielt in Mississippi der 1960er Jahre und zeigt aus den Perspektiven von drei verschiedenen Frauen die Zeit der Rassentrennung und Vorurteile. Aibeleen und Minny sind schwarze Hausmädchen für die weiße Oberschicht und erleben jeden Tag am eigenen Leib, was es für Menschen in dieser Zeit bedeutete, eine andere Hautfarbe zu haben. Eugenia Pheelan hingegen ist eine junge weiße Frau, die sich mit den an sie gestellten Anforderungen - heiraten und Kinder bekommen - nicht zufrieden stellen will. Einfühlsam und gleichzeitig schonungslos erzählt Kathryn Stockett die Geschichte der drei Frauen, darüber, wie ihre Wege sich kreuzen und über ihren mutigen Versuch etwas zu verändern.